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'Imagine your own children there': Grim reports mount from border detention camps

Mon, 06/24/2019 - 12:55

As more reports surfaced of inhumane conditions at the government’s migrant detention facilities, the movement to label them “concentration camps” picked up steam with backing from a major newspaper.


Flynn's sentencing delayed again so new lawyer can study up

Mon, 06/24/2019 - 12:51

The lawyer, Sidney Powell, said she needed the extra time to work her way through three hard drives delivered from Flynn’s former lawyers.


High rollers: Eldorado buys Caesars in deal valued at $17B

Mon, 06/24/2019 - 12:39

A casino juggernaut was formed Monday when Eldorado Resorts announced it is buying Caesars in a cash-and-stock deal valued at $17.3 billion. The acquisition will put about 60 casino-resorts in 16 states under a single name, Caesars, creating the largest gambling operator in the United States. The deal — following pressure from activist investor Carl Icahn — is targeted to close in the first half of 2020 if approved by gambling regulators and shareholders.


Global warming = more energy use = more warming

Mon, 06/24/2019 - 12:14

Even modest climate change will increase global energy demand by up to a quarter before mid-century, and by nearly 60 percent if humanity fails to curb greenhouse gas emissions, researchers said Monday. In 2018, oil and gas accounted for two thirds of global electricity generation, while solar and wind contributed less than 10 percent, according to the International Energy Agency (IEA). Hydro and nuclear energy -- which do not emit CO2 -- power a quarter of global electricity, but also have limited potential to scale up quickly.


Meet the One Plane the F-22, F-35, F-15 and Even F-16 All Need to Fight

Mon, 06/24/2019 - 12:00

Extending the strike range of attack aircraft such as an F-15, F-35 or F-22 brings great tactical significance in a modern threat environment wherein long range strike weapons used by potential adversaries could make it challenging for the Air Force to base and launch fighters within the proper striking proximity. The first new, high-tech next-generation KC-46A aerial refueling tanker will be delivered to the service later this year, marking the beginning of a long-sought after effort to replace the current aging fleet and better enable attack and ISR missions around the globe, service officials say.(This first appeared last year.)A new tanker, which will of course modernize and sustain the refueling mission for the Air Force, is fundamental to the service’s air superiority and rapid deployability priorities.The new KC-46A tanker will build upon the mission current tankers currently serve, meaning it will be forward- stationed at strategically vital locations around the globe to increase mission length and effectiveness, as needed, for a wide-range of aircraft, Air Force developers said.Extending the strike range of attack aircraft such as an F-15, F-35 or F-22 brings great tactical significance in a modern threat environment wherein long range strike weapons used by potential adversaries could make it challenging for the Air Force to base and launch fighters within the proper striking proximity. Such a dynamic may be of particular relevance in places like the Pacific, where a much-discussed "tryanny of distance" imposed by the region's geographical expanse can make attack mission access much more challengRecommended: The 5 Biggest Nuclear Bomb Tests (From All 6 Nuclear Powers).Recommended: How Israel Takes U.S. Weapons and Makes Them Better.Recommended: North Korea’s Most Lethal Weapon Isn’t Nukes.Air Force spokeswoman Maj. Emily Grabowski said the Air Force and Boeing recently completed a schedule risk assessment, and found that extended time needed for ongoing testing will delay the delivery of the first tanker by several months to close to the end of this year. The Air Force plans to acquire the new tankers will into the late 2020s.“This assessment is based on known risks and predicted impacts associated with airworthiness certifications and slower than expected flight test execution. The Air Force will continue to work with Boeing to develop schedule mitigations, where appropriate, to expedite the program,” Grabowski said.The Air Force’s multi-year tanker procurement effort, regarded and protected as a high priority from service and Pentagon leaders, is described as a needed asset to replace the aging current fleet of tankers. The average KC 135 is about 50 years old and the average KC 10 tanker is roughly 29 years old, Air Force officials said.,New Air Force Tanker Technology


NASA’s Curiosity rover saw something flash on Mars, and people are freaking out

Mon, 06/24/2019 - 11:53

Mars is almost certainly the next place in our solar system where humans will travel. We're still many years from actually seeing mankind roaming the Red Planet, but with a number of high-powered instruments already hanging out around Mars and on its surface, we have a pretty good idea of what to expect once we get there... or do we?A new image captured by NASA's Mars Curiosity rover shows something that, at the moment, remains unexplained: a bright flash popping up, seemingly out of nowhere, and with no indication of what may have caused it. The image, which was snapped on June 16th, has quickly taken the internet by storm, but NASA scientists aren't particularly concerned with what it might mean.The flash is only present in one of many consecutive images Curiosity captured that day. Images from just seconds later show absolutely nothing but the baren Martian landscape, so what caused the flash?NASA can't say for certain, but the most likely explanation is rather mundane. When we see something we can't immediately identify, especially when it's happening on another planet, it's easy to jump to some seriously wild conclusions. Perhaps it's an alien ship zooming through, or an alien surveying the planet with a flashbulb, right? Unfortunately, no.Scientists have seen these kinds of flashes in images of Mars before, and generally speaking they never really amount to much. NASA has chalked it up to reflections from distant rocks or glare caused by the Sun. The fact that NASA published a total of 21 images shot over a four-minute span and only one of those pictures includes the bright flash suggests it wasn't anything particularly meaningful.In any case, it's yet another interesting mystery for scientists to unravel between now and whenever in the near future we finally send human travelers to the Red Planet.


Booking fall travel or holiday flights? Here's how to find out if it's on a Boeing 737 Max

Mon, 06/24/2019 - 11:19

Southwest, American, United and Alaska airlines are all selling flights scheduled on the Max for post-Labor Day travel.


The Navy Would Love to 'Sink' The Littoral Combat Ship. Here's Why.

Mon, 06/24/2019 - 11:00

Given the embarrassing cost overruns and frequent mechanical failures that have plagued the program, the exquisitely-detailed report suggests that the Navy has run out of patience for the disappointment mill that is the Littoral Combat Ship, once the backbone of the future fleet that could have 355 ships.After 16 years and billions of dollars, the Navy may have finally acknowledged that its Littoral Combat Ship program looks like a miserable failure.The service “may not” deploy any of the dozen small surface combatants this year despite officials’ previous plans to deploy several to join the 7th and 5th Fleets in Singapore and Bahrain respectively, the U.S. Naval Institute first reported on April 11.(This article by Jared Keller originally appeared at Task & Purpose. Follow Task & Purpose on Twitter. This article first appeared in 2018.)Given the embarrassing cost overruns and frequent mechanical failures that have plagued the program, the exquisitely-detailed report suggests that the Navy has run out of patience for the disappointment mill that is the Littoral Combat Ship, once the backbone of the future fleet that could have 355 ships.Here’s the money graf from USNI News explaining the strange lack of upcoming deployments:Three of the Navy’s four original LCSs are in maintenance now, and four of the eight block-buy ships that have commissioned already are undergoing their initial Post Shakedown Availabilities (PSA), Cmdr. John Perkins, spokesman for Naval Surface Force Pacific, told USNI News.In addition to the deploying ships themselves being in maintenance, so too are the training ships that will be required to help train and certify the crews. The Navy upended its LCS training and manning plans in 2016 when then-SURFOR commander Vice Adm. Tom Rowden announced a change to a blue-gold crewing model and a ship reorganization ... not only does the deployable ship have to be in the water and ready for operations, but so does the training ship.


The 2020 Hyundai Palisade Follows Its Kia Brother down the Value Path

Mon, 06/24/2019 - 10:55

This new Hyundai three-row SUV doesn’t share the Telluride's styling but offers the same value.


This Is the New Land Rover Defender's Production Interior

Mon, 06/24/2019 - 10:50

Spy photos have revealed the new Defender's cockpit, and it matches a leaked image that had been posted on Twitter.


Apple was right again: Here’s why a Galaxy Note 10 without a microSD slot isn’t a big deal

Mon, 06/24/2019 - 10:21

Like its predecessors, the Galaxy Note 10 is hardly a well-kept secret. We already have renders based on leaked designs and we know almost everything there is to know about the handset. For example, the phone will feature Sound-on-Display technology, which means the entire screen works as a front speaker, but it won't have a headphone jack. The top speaker, 3.5mm port, and Bixby buttons aren't the only things Samsung removed from the phone, though. A brand new Note 10 rumor says the entry-level version of the handset will lack a microSD slot as well. This would be such a massive deal if it were to happen back in August 2015. But the Note 10 is hardly the Note 5, and expandable storage on a high-end Android phone shouldn't be considered a must-have feature anymore.Max Weinbach from xda-developers took to Twitter to post a few things he had learned from a source with access to the Note 10 and Note 10 Pro, and that's where the news comes from:https://twitter.com/mweinbachXDA/status/1142181764695281665As you can see in these tweets, he seems to have confirmed many of the current Note 10 leaks out there aside from the headphone jack, which may actually still be in the picture.https://twitter.com/mweinbachXDA/status/1142182209002102784Weinbach says the Note 10 Pro will have expandable storage, whereas the Note 10 will not. That would be a strange thing for Samsung to do, but the larger dimensions of the Note 10 would explain why Samsung might do it. Also, Samsung likes money too, so it would definitely welcome your extra cash for versions with more internal storage.When Samsung did the same thing with the Note 5 a few years ago, the cheapest version of the phone shipped with 32GB of storage. But Samsung flagships now start at 128GB of memory, which is a significant upgrade -- that goes for the Note 9 and the Galaxy S10. Add to that USB-C connectivity and speedy internet support (up to 5G), and you'd have more ways to move data at high speeds and free up your local storage than we had four years ago.Yes, Samsung brought the microSD card back after backlash from consumers. But the absence of microSD storage shouldn't be a deal-breaker in 2019. By the way, the Galaxy Fold that's still delayed would have shipped without a microSD slot too, but the foldable phone packs speedier storage. And built-in flash memory is always faster than expandable storage.Finally, by removing ports and buttons from its flagship phones, Samsung might be able to manufacture more durable handsets than before. Sooner or later, the microSD card is bound to disappear from more flagship devices, not just Samsung's. The iPhone never supported microSD cards, and Google's Pixel doesn't do it either. OnePlus has been selling phones without microSD support for years, well before significantly bumping up onboard storage, and Android fans have been buying them like crazy.


2 Infants, a Toddler and a Woman Found Dead Near Border in Texas

Mon, 06/24/2019 - 09:11

Police say they may have been dead for days before being found


No, it’s not just you: Half of the internet is down, including Google, Amazon, and Reddit

Mon, 06/24/2019 - 08:51

What better way to start off the week than by not being able to use virtually any online service or access half of the internet's most popular sites? That seems to be the case, as DownDetector (and many tweets) suggest that Google, Amazon, Reddit, and Spectrum -- just to name a few -- are experiencing issues this morning. Those issues appear to have begun around 6 or 7 AM ET, just as the East Coast was starting its day.Although some of these connection problems appear to be clearing up as of 8:40 AM (for example, Feedly is finally loading for me after being inaccessible since before 8:00 AM), it's likely going to take some time before everything is running smoothly again. Reports are still going up on DownDetector as of writing.It's unclear what is causing half of the internet to go down, but an ominous message from Discord refers to the issue as a "general internet outage," which doesn't sound like something that should be possible:https://twitter.com/ChrisGSeaton/status/1143136635153977345About an hour ago, internet service company Cloudflare says that it "identified a possible route leak impacting some Cloudflare IP ranges." [UPDATE: To be clear, Verizon was responsible for the outage, and Cloudflare was just keeping its customers informed during the recovery process.]Cloudflare followed up with another update about an hour later explaining that the leak "is impacting many internet services including Cloudflare," and moments later, announced that the network responsible for the leak had fixed the issues as of 8:42 AM ET. In theory, the worst of the outage is over.We'll be keeping an eye out for any residual issues that pop up in the hours to come, but we also hope to get a more detailed explanation for why this happened from the network responsible in the near future.UPDATE | 3:30 PM: After service was restored, Cloudflare issued the following statement (via TechCrunch):> Earlier today, a widespread BGP routing leak affected a number of Internet services and a portion of traffic to Cloudflare. All of Cloudflare's systems continued to run normally, but traffic wasn't getting to us for a portion of our domains. At this point, the network outage has been fixed and traffic levels are returning to normal.> > BGP acts as the backbone of the Internet, routing traffic through Internet transit providers and then to services like Cloudflare. There are more than 700k routes across the Internet. By nature, route leaks are localized and can be caused by error or through malicious intent. We've written extensively about BGP and how we've adopted RPKI to help further secure it.Cloudflare CEO Matthew Prince also offered a biting take of his own on Twitter:https://twitter.com/eastdakota/status/1143182575680143361


UPDATE 1-Russia warns of repeat of 1962 Cuban missile crisis

Mon, 06/24/2019 - 08:40

The U.S. deployment of land-based missile systems near Russia's borders could lead to a stand-off comparable to the 1962 Cuban missile crisis, Russian Deputy Foreign Minister Sergei Ryabkov was quoted as saying on Monday. Russia has been fiercely critical of U.S. plans to deploy missile systems in eastern Europe, and of Washington's withdrawal from the INF arms control treaty. The Cuban missile crisis erupted in 1962 when the Soviet Union responded to a U.S. missile deployment in Turkey by sending ballistic missiles to Cuba, sparking a standoff that brought the world to the brink of nuclear war.


Tennis-New world number one Barty out of Eastbourne with arm injury

Mon, 06/24/2019 - 08:38

New world number one Ashleigh Barty has suffered a Wimbledon injury scare and has withdrawn from this week's Eastbourne grasscourt tournament. The 23-year-old, who became the first Australian woman to reach the top of the WTA rankings for 43 years on Sunday when she won the Birmingham Classic, has aggravated an arm injury. "It's an injury I've had to manage since I was 16 years old," Barty told reporters at Devonshire Park on Monday.


Trump imposes further sanctions on Iran that could last years

Mon, 06/24/2019 - 07:11

Donald Trump has signed an executive order imposing further sanctions on Iran, as tensions between the US and the Middle Eastern country have escalated following an attack on an American surveillance drone.The order would deny Iranian supreme leader Ali Khamenei and others access to financial instruments, with Mr Trump declaring the measure necessary to deny Iran access to nuclear weapons, and in order to send a message after a downed spy drone nearly pulled the US into a war with the Iranian regime. But it remained doubtful whether the restrictions imposed would have any significant impact on an opaque regime that largely operates outside of mainstream global business and financial channels controlled by the US.“We will continue to increase pressure on Tehran,” Mr Trump said on Monday in the Oval Office. “Never can Iran have a nuclear weapon.”In remarks to reporters, Mr Trump stressed his administration is not interested in a military conflict with Iran, even though the president reportedly called off an attack at the last minute last week in retaliation for the drone incident.“We do not seek conflict with Iran or any other country,” Mr Trump said. “I can only tell you we cannot ever let Iran have a nuclear weapon.”He suggested the military could have a role to play in the ongoing dispute, if deemed necessary. “I think a lot of restraint has been shown by us, but that doesn’t mean we’re going to show it in the future, but I felt that we want to give it a chance ... I think Iran has a phenomenal future,” he said.In separate remarks, the US treasury secretary Steven Mnuchin said the sanctions target specific military leaders who the US believe are responsible for shooting down the US drone last week. Mr Mnuchin noted that Iranian foreign minister Mohammad Javad Zarif, alongside Mr Khamenei, is among those targeted, and that the sanctions target Iran’s “chain of command” in order to lock up billions worth of Iranian assets.“Along with our existing sanctions ... we have additional sanctions to go after the supreme leader’s office and lock up literally billions of dollars worth of assets,” Mr Mnuchin said in the White House briefing room. “Along with that action today, we are also announcing specific sanctions targeting those responsible for recent activities.”It remains unclear what, if any, impact on Iran the sanctions would have. The office of the supreme leader – a vast enterprise that includes thousands of employees – operates like a clandestine religious order, and rarely if ever taps into global financial institutions or networks. International officials from the UN and other nations who have dealings with Iran would be exempt from any sanctions.Iran’s foreign ministry spokesperson Abbas Mousavi said last week that the US had run out of sanctions targets. “Is there any new sanction that Trump has not yet imposed against the Iranian nation?” he said in a 50-second video.“He has imposed sanctions on individuals and companies and [has engaged in] economic terrorism and has started an economic war against us. Well, so far they have done everything they could,” Mr Mousavi quipped.“These sanctions in reality... are propaganda and give them a sense of achievement,” he said. “I really do not know what kind of sanctions are left that they have not imposed so far. Let them impose new sanctions and we will see what happens.”Measures threatened against Iran’s foreign minister, Mr Zarif, may also prove ineffective because he is not known to hold any foreign assets and is not regarded as particularly wealthy or enmeshed in international or local business dealings.


U.S., Taliban aim to firm up date for foreign force exit from Afghanistan

Mon, 06/24/2019 - 07:01

Upcoming peace talks between the United States and the Taliban will focus on working out a timeline for the withdrawal of U.S.-led troops from Afghanistan and on a Taliban guarantee militants won't plot attacks from Afghan soil, sources said on Monday. A seventh round of talks between the warring sides begins on Saturday in Qatar's capital of Doha, where U.S. and Taliban negotiators have been trying to hammer out a deal to end to the 18-year-long war since October. "Once the timetable for foreign force withdrawal is announced, then talks will automatically enter the next stage," said Sohail Shaheen, a spokesman for the Taliban's political office in Doha.


Three months on, landless IS still a threat in Syria

Mon, 06/24/2019 - 06:58

The Islamic State group may have lost its "caliphate", but three months later, experts have warned the jihadists are still attacking fighters and fields in Syria to show they remain relevant. The Syrian Democratic Forces announced they had expelled the extremists from their last patch of land in eastern Syria on March 23, after a months-long campaign backed by air strikes of a US-led coalition. The Kurdish-Arab alliance taking control of the riverside village of Baghouz spelt the end of the jihadist proto-state declared in 2014 in large parts of Syria and neighbouring Iraq.


Weird: India Sent a Really Old MiG-21 to Battle an U.S. Made F-16. Why?

Mon, 06/24/2019 - 06:57

On Feb. 26, 2019 Indian planes crossed the line of control at India's border with Pakistan and bombed what New Dehli described as a terrorist training camp near Balakot.The Indian air force defended its decision to send old MiG-21 fighters up against much more modern Pakistani F-16s during recent aerial skirmishes.(This first appeared in March 2019.)Several days of aerial fighting followed the bombing raid. On Feb. 27, 2019, Pakistani F-16s and other planes crossed the line of control to attack Indian forces, New Delhi claimed.Indian MiG-21s and other fighters intercepted the Pakistanis and shot down one F-16, killing its pilot, according to the Indian government. Islamabad claimed its forces shot down two MiG-21s, but New Delhi copped to losing just one jet.Pakistani forces captured the MiG-21 pilot, Wing Commander Abhinandan Varthaman, and held him for two days before handing him over to Indian officials.India's MiG-21s, while featuring some key upgrades, still are more than 30 years old. The Pakistani F-16 that the Indians shot down reportedly was a Block 52D model that Islamabad in 2005 ordered from the United States."The MiG-21 is in our inventory, why will we not use it?" Indian Air Chief Marshal BS Dhanoa rhetorically asked reporters when questioned about the aerial disparity.To be fair, India in the 1990s upgraded its MiG-21s to the "Bison" standard with Western-style avionics, a new radar and radar warning receiver and compatibility with modern weapons. "[It] has got better weapons system, better air-to-air missiles," Dhanoa pointed out.But the main reason India sent the MiG-21 into battle is that the type is still one of the most numerous in Indian air force service. "We fight with all the aircraft in our inventory," Dhanoa said.Indeed, the aerial battle in which the MiG-21 and F-16 were shot down involved, on both sides, mixed formations of old and new fighters."The MiG-21 that was shot down on Feb. 27, 2019, was part of a formation of eight Indian fighters which included four Sukhoi 30s, two upgraded Mirage 2000s and two MiG-21 Bisons that were dispatched to engage a package of 24 [Pakistani air force] jets that included eight F-16s, four Mirage III aircraft, four JF-17 Thunders," David Cenciotti reported at The Aviationist.India for years has been struggling to replace a large fleet of old, Russian-made warplanes. In 2018 the Indian air force operated 244 1960s-vintage MiG-21s and 84 MiG-27s that are only slightly younger.The MiG-21s, in particular, are accident-prone. Since the first of 874 MiG-21s entered Indian service in 1963, around 490 have crashed, killing around 200 pilots.


"I Fired a Warning Shot": Here Is What a Navy SEAL Sniper Testified at the Eddie Gallagher Trial

Mon, 06/24/2019 - 06:38

NAVAL BASE SAN DIEGO — A Navy SEAL sniper testified on Friday that he fired warning shots to scare away a civilian noncombatant in Mosul before Chief Eddie Gallagher fired and told them over the radio, "you guys missed him but I got him."Under direct examination by prosecutors, Special Warfare Operator 1st Class Dalton Tolbert recounted the alleged shooting of an old man along the Tigris river during the Battle of Mosul in 2017. At the time, Tolbert was a member of SEAL Team 7 Alpha Platoon who was stationed in the south tower of a bombed out building, while Gallagher and others were stationed in the north tower.Tolbert testified that he was scanning windows along the riverbank searching for targets when he noticed a man moving closer to the river. As another SEAL explained in previous testimony, firing warning shots to keep civilians off the battlefield was a standard practice, according to their rules of engagement."I aimed to the side — far to the side — and fired," Tolbert testified. "I took the shot. The man got startled."The man then ran from the river to a nearby building and tried to go inside, but the door was locked, Tolbert said. "He ran north to south across the road," Tolbert said. "That's when I saw the red mark on his back and I saw him fall for the first time. Blood started to pool and I knew it was a square hit in the back." Over the radio, he said he heard Gallagher tell the other snipers, "you guys missed him but I got him."Tolbert said the man, who was wearing traditional garb, then stood back up and ran away.Gallagher is accused of murdering a wounded fighter and separately firing on innocent civilians during a deployment to Mosul, Iraq in 2017. He has pleaded not guilty."I saw Eddie Gallagher shoot someone who didn't deserve to die," Tolbert testified. "I shot more warning shots to save civilians from Eddie than I ever did at ISIS."Under cross-examination, Tolbert said he did not tell other snipers over the radio that the man he was firing on was a civilian he was just trying to scare away. He explained that he didn't say anything since each tower was typically covering their own sectors of fire (it was not clear which tower in this incident was firing in the wrong sector).


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