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Updated: 17 hours 49 min ago

Somalia's deadliest bombing kills 276, injures 300

Mon, 10/16/2017 - 12:45

Desperate Somalis searched for news of missing loved-ones on Monday, after a massive truck bomb in Mogadishu killed at least 276 people and left 300 injured in the deadliest ever attack to hit the conflict-torn nation. Residents of the Somali capital, while wearily accustomed to regular bombs and attacks by Islamist militants, have been left stunned by the monster explosion Saturday which gutted surrounding buildings and left victims burned beyond recognition. The government said it had set up an emergency committee to help relatives find the missing, with a crisis centre in the capital that residents can turn to.


Israeli military strikes anti-aircraft battery in Syria

Mon, 10/16/2017 - 12:23

The Israeli military said it struck and destroyed an anti-aircraft battery deep in Syria on Monday after it had opened fire on Israeli jets flying over Lebanon — the first such incident of Syrian forces targeting Israeli planes since the civil war began in 2011.


Harrowing viral footage shows 3-year-old riding a 20-foot python

Mon, 10/16/2017 - 11:56

Shocking footage that shows a little boy riding a 20-foot python in the streets of northern Vietnam is quickly making its way around the internet. 


Kenya police killed 67 opposition supporters: Rights groups

Mon, 10/16/2017 - 11:48

NAIROBI, Kenya (AP) — Kenya police shot dead a street vendor as opposition supporters held demonstrations calling for electoral reform, a senior police official said Monday, while human rights groups said police had killed dozens of people who protested after August's now-annulled presidential election.


'Did Mike make you pray?' Trump reportedly mocks Pence's 'religiosity'

Mon, 10/16/2017 - 11:27

According to a lengthy "New Yorker" magazine profile of Mike Pence, the president has been known to mock the vice president’s evangelical values behind closed doors.


Israel uncovers Roman structure at foot of Jerusalem's Western Wall

Mon, 10/16/2017 - 11:16

Israeli archaeologists in Jerusalem's Old City on Monday unveiled a newly unearthed section of the Western Wall and the first Roman public structure ever discovered in the city, they said. Archaeologist Joe Uziel said he and his colleagues knew the wall section was there and had expected to find a Roman street at its base. The Israel Antiquities Authority (IAA), which conducted the two-year dig, said that historical sources mentioned such structures but in 150 years of modern archaeological research in the city none had been found.


Man held hostage by Taliban for five years assumed captors were joking when they said Trump was President

Mon, 10/16/2017 - 11:06

A Canadian man who was recently rescued from Taliban-tied kidnappers thought his captors were joking when they told him Donald Trump is president. “It didn’t enter my mind that he was being serious,” Joshua Boyle, who was rescued alongside his wife and three children in Pakistan after five years imprisonment, told the Toronto Star. Mr Boyle was surprised to hear that Mr Trump had been elected even before he and his wife were forced to film a “proof-of-life” video that was sent to investigators and their family.


Aimmune teams with Regeneron, Sanofi on peanut allergy drug

Mon, 10/16/2017 - 09:20

(Reuters) - Aimmune Therapeutics Inc said on Monday it would collaborate with Regeneron Pharmaceuticals Inc and Sanofi to develop its experimental peanut allergy drug. The company said it would test the drug, AR101, in combination with Regeneron and Sanofi's dupilumab in a mid-stage trial that is expected to start in 2018 and will be sponsored by Regeneron. AR101, an oral immunotherapy, is already being tested as a mono-therapy for peanut allergy in a late-stage trial.


Toddler Drowns in Grease Pit at Ice Cream Shop

Mon, 10/16/2017 - 09:12

A family in Alabama mourns the loss of a 3-year-old girl after she tragically died at an ice cream shop. Susana Victoria Perez (@susana_vp) has more.


Monday's Morning Email: Inside Trump's Moves With Obamacare To 'Blow That Thing Up'

Mon, 10/16/2017 - 08:03

TOP STORIES (And want to get The Morning Email each weekday?


2018 Harley-Davidson Street Bob – First Ride

Mon, 10/16/2017 - 08:00

2018 Harley-Davidson Street Bob – First Ride Bare-essentials big twin may be best of the bunch “Llibertat ,” is a word moto-journalists became pretty familiar with during last month’s Harley-Davidson press ride in Catalunya. The English version of the word –


Kevin James Explains Why 'Kevin Can Wait' Killed Off His Wife

Mon, 10/16/2017 - 07:35

Kevin James said his sitcom “Kevin Can Wait” killed off his on-screen wife after last season because “we were literally just running out of ideas.”


Rotary could return in both sports car and extended-range EV, says Mazda exec

Mon, 10/16/2017 - 06:30

Mazda is committed to the rotary, though whether the unique engine design is used to directly power a sports car or serve as a range-extender for an electric car remains to be seen. Mazda has hinted at both options in recent years but so far has tended to flip-flop between the two. Now, though, a senior Mazda executive has hinted that both options could be on the table.


Madrid set to impose direct rule on Catalonia as independence deadline passes

Mon, 10/16/2017 - 06:11

The Spanish government has warned Catalan leader Carles Puigdemont he faces his final chance to relinquish independence within three days or it would trigger Article 155, the so-called 'nuclear option' which would override Catalonia's autonomy. Prime Minister Mariano Rajoy had set a deadline of 10am local time yesterday for Mr Puigdemont to clarify whether or not the autonomous region had made a unilateral declaration of independence last week. The Catalan president responded with a four-page letter that did not directly answer the question but instead stressed a mandate for independence and called for urgent dialogue.   The Spanish government had made clear that anything less than a “No” would set in motion Article 155, a never-used constitutional tool allowing it to effectively suspend autonomous powers and rule directly from Madrid.  Spanish Prime Minister Mariano Rajoy has a set a deadline for overriding Catalonia's autonomy. Credit: Lavandeira jr/EFE  That is now set to be applied on Friday, if Mr Puigdemont does not reverse his position during a further three-day grace period. The Spanish deputy prime minister, Maria Soraya Saenz de Santamaria, said the government interpreted his response as a confirmation that declaration had indeed been declared. Demanding Mr Puigdemont retract this by Thursday at 10am, she insisted it was "in his hands to avoid the next steps". Mr Puigdemont, who had been under heavy pressure from independence hardliners to confirm an abrupt split from Spain, had called for an urgent meeting with Mr Rajoy in his letter. He said the banned independence referendum had returned a mandate for an independent state but insisted the regional government’s priority was a negotiated solution, eyeing a two-month period for dialogue. Carles Puidgemont delivering a speech at the Fossar de la Pederera Credit: Ivan Alvarado/Reuters Mr Rajoy responded with a letter of his own, in which he told Mr Puigdemont he still had a chance to respond in a "clear and simple way” to Madrid’s request. If he did not do so, he “will be the only one responsible for the application of the constitution,” he said.  Alfonso Dastis, the Spanish foreign minister, said “the most radical influences had prevailed” in Mr Puigdemont’s decision. But the Catalan president’s letter did not go far enough to satisfy the CUP, the hard Left partner that is crucial to the Catalan government’s parliamentary majority, which is now pushing for a clear affirmation of independence on Thursday.  “The CUP would have sent a very different letter,” said parliamentarian Mireia Boya. Further adding to tensions yesterday, the Catalan police chief and the leaders of two major pro-independence groups appeared in court in Madrid to face allegations of sedition. The Spanish attorney general asked the judge to remand Major Josep Lluis Trapero in custody, with judicial sources quoted by La Vanguardia citing fears he could continue to give orders to the Catalan force to subvert Madrid's clampdown. Major Josep Lluis Trapero leaves Audiencia Nacional Court in Madrid Credit: Kiko Huesca/EFE The judge did not agree to the attorney-general's request to take Major Josep Lluis Trapero into custody, but imposed the conditions he surrender his passport and report to a court every 15 days. The same conditions were imposed on another Catalan police official.


Iraqi and Kurdish forces clash over disputed city of Kirkuk

Mon, 10/16/2017 - 03:54

 Iraqi Kurdish officials said early Monday that federal forces and state-backed militias have launched a "major, multi-pronged" attack aimed at retaking the disputed northern city of Kirkuk, causing "lots of casualties" in fighting south of the city. The Kurdistan Region Security Council said in a statement that Kurdish forces known as peshmerga have destroyed at least five U.S.-supplied Humvees being used by the state-sanctioned militias following the "unprovoked attack" south of the city. Inside Kirkuk, a multi-ethnic city that is home to more than 1 million people, residents shuttered themselves in homes and reported hearing sporadic booms they said sounded like shelling and rocket fire. Kurdish peshmerga fighters stand on the roof top of a building as they hold a position on the opposition side of river bank from Iraqi forces on the southern outskirts of Kirkuk  Credit: AFP Brig. Gen. Bahzad Ahmed, a spokesman for Kurdish forces, said federal forces have seized an oil and gas company and other industrial areas south of Kirkuk in fighting with Kurdish forces that caused "lots of casualties," without providing a specific figure. He said Iraqi forces have "burnt lots of houses and killed many people" in Toz Khormato and Daquq, south of the disputed city. He said Kurdish forces, known as peshmerga, have "destroyed one or two of their tanks." His claims could not be independently verified. Iraq's Interior Ministry said in a brief statement that federal forces have taken control of a power plant, a police station and industrial areas near Kirkuk. It provided no further details on the fighting or casualties in what it referred to as Operation Impose Security on Kirkuk. Kurdish forces on an armoured vehicle drive in the street of Kirkuk, Iraq, October 16, 2017, in this still image taken from a video.  Credit:  KURDISTAN 24 TV via REUTERS TV Tensions have soared since the Kurds held a non-binding referendum last month in which they voted for independence from Iraq. The central government, along with neighboring Turkey and Iran, rejected the vote. The United States has supplied and trained Iraqi federal forces and the peshmerga, both of which are fighting the Islamic State group. The U.S. also opposed the referendum, and has urged both sides to remain focused on defeating the extremists. U.S. Army Col. Ryan Dillon, a spokesman for the U.S.-led coalition, tweeted that it was "closely monitoring sit. near Kirkuk; urge all sides to avoid escalatory actions. Finish the fight vs. (hash)ISIS, biggest threat to all." ISIS is another acronym for the Islamic State group. The central government and the autonomous Kurdish region in the north have long been divided over oil revenues and the fate of disputed territories like Kirkuk that are controlled by Kurdish forces but are outside their self-ruled region. The Kurds assumed control of Kirkuk, in the heart of a major oil-producing region, in the summer of 2014, when IS militants swept across northern Iraq and the country's armed forces crumbled. Baghdad has demanded the Kurds withdraw. The Kurdish security council said the assault launched late Sunday was aimed at entering the city and retaking the K-1 military base and nearby oil fields. State-run Al-Iraqiya TV had earlier reported that federal forces rolled into parts of the countryside outside Kirkuk without facing resistance. However, some residents of the city and an Iraqi militia commander reported shelling. Al-Iraqiya carried a statement from Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi's office saying he had ordered federal forces to "impose security in the city in cooperation with the inhabitants and the peshmerga," indicating he was willing to share administration. A commander of the local Kurdish police force said his forces remained in control of the province's disputed oil wells. "There's been no agreement to hand over the wells until now. As for the future, I don't know," said Bahja Ahmad Amin. Iraq's state-sanctioned militias, the mostly Shiite Arab Popular Mobilization Forces, were ordered to stay out of the city, according to al-Abadi's office, and instead keep positions in the countryside. They are viewed with deep suspicion by Kurdish residents, who see them as beholden to Iran rather than Iraq's central government. The predominantly Shiite militias are sponsored and guided by Tehran. Ercuman Turkman, a PMF commander, said shortly before forces began moving in that he expected orders to move on Kirkuk's oil wells, its airport and the nearby K-1 military base, but not the city. Haytham Hashem, another PMF commander, reported shelling on his position in Toz Khormato, 10 kilometers (6 miles) from the edge of Kirkuk city. Baghdad has been turning the screws on the Kurdish region since the September referendum, pushing Kurd leaders to disavow the vote and accept shared administration over Kirkuk. Iraq's government barred international flights to and from the region and asked neighboring Turkey and Iran to close their borders. Iran closed its three official crossings with the Kurdish region Sunday, Kurdish media reported. It also froze currency transfers to four banks operating in the Kurdish region. Al-Abadi has demanded shared administration over Kirkuk. His Cabinet said Sunday that fighters from Turkey's Kurdish insurgency, the PKK, were beginning to appear in Kirkuk, and declared that would be tantamount to an act of war.


#MeToo: Alyssa Milano's Call For Sexual Abuse Victims To Come Forward Goes Viral

Mon, 10/16/2017 - 01:01

#MeToo quickly became the top trending Twitter hashtag Sunday night as women spoke up to show the world just how common sexual harassment and sexual assault are.


Bowe Bergdahl Responds to Those Who Called Him a Traitor

Mon, 10/16/2017 - 00:00

In his first television interview, the soldier who pleaded guilty to desertion charges after spending five years in Taliban captivity says a fair trial would have been impossible given campaign trail comments made by Donald Trump.


Death Match: America's Stealth Zumwalt Destroyer vs. Russia's Big Battlecruiser

Sun, 10/15/2017 - 20:43

Zumwalt, unable to get close enough to target with guns and Kirov, unable to use its radar-guided weapons, both break off to fight another day. After more than a decade of supporting land wars in the Middle East and Central Asia, the U.S. Navy is reinvesting in the core mission of sinking ships. The U.S. Navy is expanding this capability but at the same time introducing a new class of ship, the guided missile destroyer USS Zumwalt, designed primarily to support land warfare.


The F-35 and F/A-18 Super Hornet: The Ultimate Military Combination?

Sun, 10/15/2017 - 20:21

In June, the U.S. Navy released a budget allocating $264.9 million towards upgrading its roughly six hundred FA-18E and F Super Hornet and EA-18G Growler fighters to the new Block III standard, which includes some of the enhancements proposed for the Advanced Super Hornet. The first of the upgraded aircraft are expected to enter service in 2019, and the Pentagon is now talking about keeping its Super Hornet fleet active through 2046. A few days later, the Navy also announced plans to purchase an additional eighty Super Hornets over the next five years for $7.1 billion.


Researchers sound alarm over Antarctic penguin chick deaths

Sun, 10/15/2017 - 17:56

BERLIN (AP) — Almost the entire cohort of chicks from an Adelie penguin colony in the eastern Antarctic was wiped out by starvation last summer in what scientists say is only the second such incident in over 40 years.


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