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Video: 5 Things to Know About Daylight Saving Time

Top Stories - Sat, 03/10/2018 - 20:14

March 11, 2018 is Daylight Saving Time. Did you know that the biannual tradition celebrates 100 years, this year? Daylight Savings Time, What You Need to Know Established in the U.S. in 1918 Established to save energy, but time-skeptics say that is no longer the case Arizona and Hawaii refuse to change their DST clocks Florida is fighting to become exempt from the time-warp The Federal Government controls DST as well as time zones Check out Kinsey Grant's Dumbest Thing on Wall Street and Subscribe on Youtube:

Bono sorry after bullying claims at ONE charity

Top Stories - Sat, 03/10/2018 - 19:43

U2 frontman Bono has apologised after claims emerged Sunday that workers at his ONE charity were subjected to a culture of abuse and bullying. The Irish singer, 57, said he was "deeply sorry" and "furious" about the allegations, which appeared in The Mail on Sunday newspaper, and pledged to meet victims to apologise in person. The British tabloid detailed a string of incidents, including claims from a married woman who said she was demoted after refusing to have sex with a Tanzanian member of parliament.

Steve Bannon: 'Let Them Call You Racist; Wear It As A Badge Of Honor'

Top Stories - Sat, 03/10/2018 - 19:15

Footage of Bannon’s remarks shows him predicting “victory after victory” for the far right over the “globalists.” The term is one extreme-right groups often use as an anti-Semitic slur, referring to what they see as Jewish control of financial institutions and media around the world. Bannon roused National Front members in Lille, France, to their feet, telling them: “History is on our side.

Zoos are rating animals online and it's too good

Top Stories - Sat, 03/10/2018 - 18:09

Zoos are giving animals Amazon-esque species ratings, and it's honestly kind of great. The trend started Friday with the Oregon Zoo in a tweet hashtagged #rateaspecies. Other animal conservancies got in on the fun – including aquariums – providing informative ratings for people looking to, er, buy the products. SEE ALSO: We're calling 'fake news' on the report that 'Black Panther' caused a surge in black cat adoptions ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️ FIRST IMPRESSIONSOverall very good first impressions. Sturdy built, totally winter-ready and waterproof. Only comes in brown but that’s actually a plus for me. #rateaspecies pic.twitter.com/IK99ODsTPT — Oregon Zoo (@OregonZoo) March 9, 2018 ⭐️⭐️⭐️ otter be 4 stars butok first of all i'm very satisfied much improved over river edition. extremely warm insulation which adds buoyancy. if u like kelp the UrchinCrusher+ is a must on coastal trips. minus one star because it's actually a weasel lol?! #rateaspecies pic.twitter.com/oCGV3aGlZ0 — Monterey Bay Aquarium (@MontereyAq) March 9, 2018 ⭐ ⭐ ⭐ ⭐ ⭐ A+ VINTAGE ROADSTERDespite few major design updates since the Ice Age, a worthy investment for current and future aficionados. Oxygen-processing and sustained land speed unparalleled. Extremely rare, though hopefully not for long.#rateaspecies pic.twitter.com/Dqa0Gp7Q7m — Los Angeles Zoo and Botanical Gardens (@LAZoo) March 9, 2018 ⭐ very unsatisfied with the shipping. I ordered a frog and what I got was this big melted pile. #rateaspecies pic.twitter.com/6pj9D2HcED — Slartibartfast (@shtoopy) March 9, 2018 ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️ POUNCE ON THIS ONEStarted out small but got stretched out over time. Still, even after heavy use in all weather, very tough, very hardy. #rateaspecies pic.twitter.com/lPCLxIfCYi — Woodland Park Zoo (@woodlandparkzoo) March 9, 2018 ⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐Pleasantly surprised. Thought I had ordered a Roomba, but this did an excellent job of cleaning up my ecosystem. Only downside is the projectile vomiting. Overall 5 stars, would drunkenly purchase again. #rateaspecies pic.twitter.com/5fDfHiaWNq — Katherine O'Reilly (@DrKatfish) March 9, 2018 ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️ VERY HAPPYNot to be confused with a smiling leaf. Very bouncy and keeps cricket population under control. Offers eye antennas for improved smile signal. #rateaspecies pic.twitter.com/qz4frTnoqL — Josh's Frogs (@JoshsFrogs) March 9, 2018 ⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐ THESE FISH ARE NOT BROKENAnyone who says otherwise didn't read the instructions. A+ globiform, not supposed to swim well just look cute, does as promised. #rateaspecies pic.twitter.com/86q4PFhM83 — CA AcademyOfSciences (@calacademy) March 9, 2018 WATCH: We could see a decline in King Penguins thanks to — you guessed it — climate change

'The New York Times' profiled the most selfish person in America

Top Stories - Sat, 03/10/2018 - 17:53

Everybody who has dealt with any minor amount of stress has had the fantasy of packing up and running away from all of their problems, disappearing from the modern world almost entirely. Erik Hagerman, dubbed "The man who knew too little" by The New York Times, did just that. On Saturday, Hagerman was the focus of a newly published profile describing how, after the election of Donald Trump, he left his busy life behind and started up his own pig farm. SEE ALSO: I went to a self-esteem workshop for young girls, and this is what I learned But Hagerman went much further than that — and much more selfish. He created what he calls "The Blockade," a nearly total media blackout that has allowed him to stay 100 percent ignorant of the day's news outside of the weather, local real estate listings, and how the Cleveland Cavaliers are doing.  He doesn't know about the turmoil of Trump's White House. He doesn't know about the white supremacists and neo-Nazis that marched in Charlottesville. He doesn't know about the school shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School. He doesn't know who won out at the Oscars. Ignorance, in Hagerman's case, is bliss. But that bliss comes at the cost of not being a member of the democratic republic of the United States. And that bliss wouldn't be possible without a lot of privilege and a lot of demands from family, friends, and strangers. The privilege of ignorance Not everyone gets to be ignorant. People whose families are being torn apart by the deportation tactics of U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) agents don't get to be ignorant. People who are affected by gun violence don't get to be ignorant. People who require health care to live past the end of the month don't get to be ignorant. But Hagerman gets to be ignorant. As a white male who had the opportunity to make (and save) a lot of money, he isn't directly affected by many of the things that happen inside his country and to his fellow citizens. SEE ALSO: Stoneman Douglas alumni rise up in incredible ways to support shooting survivors His own sister Bonnie calls out that privilege, saying: "We all would like to construct our dream worlds. Erik is just more able to do it than others." Hagerman's Blockade means he doesn't have to worry about the problems of his fellow citizens, his neighbors, or even some of his family members. He doesn't even have to worry about his own money because he can afford to have a financial adviser managing all of his investments.  It's OK to tune out every once in a while and unplug, maybe take a break from Twitter for a week, but opting out of the larger world completely is a kind of self-care that does more harm than good. If everyone did what Hagerman did, there would be no United States. There would be no democracy. There would be no forward progress or people helping others in times of need. There would be nothing but complacency in the suffering and exploitation of others. That kind of privilege isn't easy to come by, but Hagerman was born lucky enough to have it, and he's exploiting it to its fullest extent. High demands In order to keep up The Blockade, Hagerman asks a lot of the people around him. Not only does he not look at newspapers and listen to white noise when he hangs out at a local café, he has to ask his mom to not talk about current events when they chat on the phone.  In order to watch the Cleveland Cavaliers, he puts the TV on mute just in case the commentators say anything that could give him a clue into what's going on in the world. He asked the people who work at his local café not to talk about the news with him, and they comply. SEE ALSO: ‘What am I gonna go home to? Water?’: The climate refugees settling in America’s heartland When he visited his brother on the West Coast, he left when his brother had people over, lest he hear about something that affects anyone except himself.  It takes a lot for Hagerman to ignore the plights of other people, not just from himself and the guilt that comes with it, but from everyone else around him. And as carefree as he says he is, that guilt still exists, Hagerman admitted. “The first several months of this thing, I didn’t feel all that great about it,” he told the Times. “It makes me a crappy citizen. It’s the ostrich head-in-the-sand approach to political outcomes you disagree with.” At least he has a little project to help him feel a little better about himself and give back to world a little bit. Give and take For all that Hagerman asks of those around him, he gives one thing back: a lake. His big project, his way of making up for not caring about anyone else in the world except himself, is a piece of land that used to be a coal mine, which he is slowly but surely developing into a vague sort of public space that he plans to donate to the community. The Lake, as Hagerman calls it, sounds like it's going to be some kind of a park that also has some artwork and structures on it, which sounds like a nice place for future people to hang out at. But does it make up for all his coming years of selfishness and lack of participation in our society?  No, probably not. WATCH: The internet trolled Trump for this roast-worthy habit during his SOTU

An EPA scientific committee hasn’t met in 6 months because of a paperwork error

Top Stories - Sat, 03/10/2018 - 17:10

The board of scientists advising the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has not met in six months, in part due to a paperwork error. The 45 members of the group - who last met in August 2017 - evaluate the science the EPA uses to craft policy, per the US Congress - but they have not even had conference calls or any votes on matters since the last meeting since there were not enough of them to reach a quorum. Michael Honeycutt, who heads the board for the EPA, blamed the delay on human resources bureaucracy in the federal government.

Pomona police officer killed, another wounded by gunman during standoff at apartment

Top Stories - Sat, 03/10/2018 - 16:08

A Pomona police officer has died and another has been hospitalized after both were shot during an ongoing standoff with an armed suspect.

Couple Hilariously Shoots Engagement Photos at Target Because They Love it so Much

Top Stories - Sat, 03/10/2018 - 15:51

Going to the store had become a tradition for them.

Abu Dhabi in the clouds: Otherworldly images of the city's landmarks

Top Stories - Sat, 03/10/2018 - 13:29

Khalid Alhammadi photographs Abu Dhabi's tallest landmarks rising high above the mist.

US to re-open consulate at Mexican resort after threat

Top Stories - Sat, 03/10/2018 - 12:49

The US consulate at the Mexican Caribbean resort of Playa del Carmen will re-open Monday after it was closed for several days due to an unspecified security threat, the US embassy said. US government personnel are banned from several area neighborhoods until further notice, but "are authorized to travel to resort areas in Riviera Maya including those near Playa del Carmen," the statement read. The beachside tourist magnets of Cancun and Playa del Carmen are located in the Riviera Maya, on Mexico's Yucatan peninsula.

Pennsylvania Republican Defends 'Right-To-Work' Laws Before Vote In Union-Heavy District

Top Stories - Sat, 03/10/2018 - 12:19

PITTSBURGH ― Republican Rick Saccone defended so-called “right-to-work” laws three days before a special election in a Western Pennsylvania district with a high rate of union membership. Saccone, the GOP nominee in Pennsylvania’s 18th Congressional District, took reporters’ questions at a small campaign event in the offices of the Republican Committee of Allegheny County on Friday evening. Asked whether he would support a national right-to-work law, Saccone would not answer directly.

Ageing Japanese towns overrun by wild boars

Top Stories - Sat, 03/10/2018 - 11:36

Less than 20 years ago, the only challenges for the 100 residents of the tiny island of Kakara, off southwest Japan, were the elements and ensuring the fishermen’s catch could get to market on time.  Today, the islanders are outnumbered three to one by wild boar who feast on their gardens and are becoming increasingly aggressive and territorial. The problems facing the residents of Kakara are being repeated across Japan, with boar numbers exploding as rural populations decline.  Japan's rapidly ageing and shrinking population is part of the reason behind the increase in wild boar, as older rural populations die out, leaving towns and villages empty. Meanwhile, young people are also moving to the cities in search of work. The number of people with shotgun licenses has also fallen sharply in recent years. And as the people leave, the boar are moving in. The first boars apparently swam to Kakara, which covers a mere 1 square mile and sits between Fukuoka and Saga prefectures, but have been in hog heaven ever since.  They have found a place with no natural predators and plenty of crops, such as pumpkins and sweet potatoes, that the local people grow in their back gardens. Other than farming and fishing, the island’s only other industries were small-scale tourism and growing camellia for use in cosmetics, Kyodo News reported, but the famously aggressive boar have chased the tourists away and eaten the camellia plants. Local children cannot play outdoors for fear of being attacked and residents have stopped walking even relatively short distances for fear of encountering one of the aggressive creatures. Desperate islanders have set countless traps and catch around 50 of their tormentors every year, but that figure is far outstripped by the rapidly breeding boar population – a sow can give birth to as many as six piglets a years. Some residents are even suggesting that they should evacuate the island, abandoning it to the wild pigs. Across Japan, confrontations between boar and man are inevitable as the hog population rises, and rural media are frequently reporting incidents in which humans have come face-to-face with large beasts. In October, a large specimen barrelled into a suburban shopping mall on the island of Shikoku, biting five staff and causing mayhem before it was captured. In December, two boars managed to get into a high school in Kyoto and panicked students had to be evacuated. Elsewhere, they are finding their way out of the forests and fields and into train stations, gardens and school sports grounds. And with few checks on the boars’ territory, they are growing larger as well as more numerous. In February, farmers in north-east Japan caught a male that weighed in at 280 pounds, well over the average 220 pounds of boars in Europe.  They are also expanding their range into areas that were previously considered too inhospitable, taking over villages with shrinking populations. They are being given even greater licence to roam in areas close to the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear plant, abandoned in March 2011 in the aftermath of the destruction of three of the plant’s reactors and the release of radiation across the surrounding countryside. Local people fled to safety; the wildlife remained and thrived.

Suspect in Fatal Shooting of Pomona Police Officer Is Arrested

Top Stories - Sat, 03/10/2018 - 11:22

The suspect remains barricaded inside an apartment

Officer killed in California after pursuit and standoff

Top Stories - Sat, 03/10/2018 - 10:47

A reckless driving suspect barricaded himself inside an apartment complex and shot at two officers through the door, leaving one dead. The suspect is now custody.

Suspected shooter and three women dead after standoff at veterans home

Top Stories - Sat, 03/10/2018 - 10:46

The community in Yountville, California are remembering the victims of the standoff: three staff members at the nation’s largest veterans home, one of whom was seven months pregnant.

The West Virginia teachers' strike is what real resistance looks like

Top Stories - Sat, 03/10/2018 - 10:34

This kind of resistance does not allow onlookers to look away, especially in an age of social media. The victorious strike by teachers in West Virginia did not only result in a long overdue pay raise. With the exuberance of a nine-day teach-in, the teachers and their supporters have taught the nation a compelling lesson on the historical role of a true resistance.

Turkish-backed rebels advance on Kurdish-held Syrian town

Top Stories - Sat, 03/10/2018 - 09:40

Turkish forces and allied Syrian rebels battling Kurdish militia in northern Syria advanced on Saturday to less than two kilometres from the flashpoint town of Afrin, a war monitor said. The move came as Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan threatened again to "purge" Kurdish militia from the town. Turkey launched operation "Olive Branch" on January 20 against the powerful Kurdish People's Protection Units (YPG), which controls the Afrin region in northwest Syria and which Ankara regards as a "terror group".

Turkish forces reach outskirts of Afrin town: monitor

Top Stories - Sat, 03/10/2018 - 09:34

Turkish forces have reached the outskirts of the town of Afrin after a weeks-long campaign against a Kurdish militia in northwest Syria, the Syrian Observatory for Human Rights war monitoring group said on Saturday. Turkey and allied Syrian rebel groups it supports are advancing on the town from the east under intense bombardment, the Britain-based Observatory said. Ankara launched its offensive in the Afrin region on its border in January, aiming to drive out the Syrian Kurdish YPG militia, which it sees as an extension of the PKK group that has fought a three-decade insurgency inside Turkey.

Black Girl Magic Is Written In The Pages Of ‘A Wrinkle In Time’

Top Stories - Sat, 03/10/2018 - 09:01

Fifty-six years after it’s publication, Madeleine L’Engle’s beloved children’s book A Wrinkle In Time came to the big screen under the direction of Ava DuVernay, the Oscar-nominated black woman filmmaker from Compton. DuVernay’s version of the classic story comes with many changes, the most obvious being that the main protagonist Meg looks a lot different than how many readers may have imagined her. DuVernay’s creation is a representation of multifaceted black girlhood where positive traits, like love, hope and determination exist alongside anger, stubbornness and impatience.

U.S.'s Tillerson 'not feeling well', cancels activities in Kenya

Top Stories - Sat, 03/10/2018 - 08:28

U.S. Secretary of State Rex Tillerson cancelled scheduled events on Saturday on the second day of a visit to Kenya because he had been feeling unwell, a State Department spokesman said, adding that he would resume his programme on Sunday. "The secretary is not feeling well after a long couple days working on major issues back home such as North Korea and has cancelled his events for the day," spokesman Steve Goldstein told reporters travelling with Tillerson. "Some events will go ahead without him, while they are looking at the possibility of rescheduling others," said Goldstein, under-secretary of state for public diplomacy and public affairs at the State Department.


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